Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Information about Managed Care in Florida






Subscribe to our ADA Expertise Listserv and get information sent directly to your inbox. To subscribe, send an email to Marc Dubin, Esq., at mdubin@pobox.com. Include your name and contact information, and write "subscribe to ADA listserv."

New England Journal of Medicine: Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in U.S. Soldiers Returning from Iraq

http://www.dtic.mil/get-tr-doc/pdf?AD=ADA479403


page1image5176 page1image5336
ABSTRACT
page1image5944
Background
An important medical concern of the Iraq war is the potential long-term effect of mild traumatic brain injury, or concussion, particularly from blast explosions. However, the epidemiology of combat-related mild traumatic brain injury is poorly understood.
Methods
We surveyed 2525 U.S. Army infantry soldiers 3 to 4 months after their return from a year-long deployment to Iraq. Validated clinical instruments were used to com- pare soldiers reporting mild traumatic brain injury, defined as an injury with loss of consciousness or altered mental status (e.g., dazed or confused), with soldiers who reported other injuries.
Results
Of 2525 soldiers, 124 (4.9%) reported injuries with loss of consciousness, 260 (10.3%) reported injuries with altered mental status, and 435 (17.2%) reported other injuries during deployment. Of those reporting loss of consciousness, 43.9% met criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), as compared with 27.3% of those reporting altered mental status, 16.2% with other injuries, and 9.1% with no injury. Soldiers with mild traumatic brain injury, primarily those who had loss of consciousness, were significantly more likely to report poor general health, missed workdays, medical visits, and a high number of somatic and postconcussive symptoms than were soldiers with other injuries. However, after adjustment for PTSD and depres- sion, mild traumatic brain injury was no longer significantly associated with these physical health outcomes or symptoms, except for headache.
Conclusions
Mild traumatic brain injury (i.e., concussion) occurring among soldiers deployed in Iraq is strongly associated with PTSD and physical health problems 3 to 4 months after the soldiers return home. PTSD and depression are important mediators of the relationship between mild traumatic brain injury and physical health problems.
From the Division of Psychiatry and Neu­ roscience, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, Silver Spring, MD (C.W.H., D.M., J.L.T., A.L.C., C.A.C.); and the Deployment Health Clinical Center and Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences, Washington, DC (C.C.E.). Address reprint requests to Dr. Hoge at the Division of Psychiatry and Neuro­ science, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, 503 Robert Grant Ave., Silver Spring, MD 20910, or at charles.hoge@ us.army.mil.
N Engl J Med 2008;358:453­63.
Copyright © 2008 Massachusetts Medical Society.


Subscribe to our ADA Expertise Listserv and get information sent directly to your inbox. To subscribe, send an email to Marc Dubin, Esq., at mdubin@pobox.com. Include your name and contact information, and write "subscribe to ADA listserv."

Study Finds Chronic Use of Painkillers by Growing Number of Americans on Disability Benefits



A new study has found that a growing number of Americans on Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits use powerful prescription painkillers. Researchers found that between 2007 and 2011, about 44 percent of people receiving SSDI were prescribed narcotic painkillers each year. The trend is cause for concern because narcotic painkillers, which include OxyContin, Percocet and Vicodin, can be addictive and abused. Learn more about prescription painkiller risks.


Subscribe to our ADA Expertise Listserv and get information sent directly to your inbox. To subscribe, send an email to Marc Dubin, Esq., at mdubin@pobox.com. Include your name and contact information, and write "subscribe to ADA listserv."

EEOC Files Suit On Behalf of Employee with MS



Source:

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has charged Lifecare Medical Services, Inc. with disability discrimination under the Americans with Disabilities Act. The Akron, OH-based company allegedly denied areasonable accommodation to an employee who has multiple sclerosis. The employee had requested additional leave, but was disciplined and later fired for absences due to his disability.


Subscribe to our ADA Expertise Listserv and get information sent directly to your inbox. To subscribe, send an email to Marc Dubin, Esq., at mdubin@pobox.com. Include your name and contact information, and write "subscribe to ADA listserv."

NY Times: When the Caregivers Need Healing


http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/29/health/when-the-caregivers-need-healing.html

"...All parents endure stress, but studies show that parents of children with developmental disabilities, like autism, experience depression and anxiety far more often. Struggling to obtain crucial support services, the financial strain of paying for various therapies, the relentless worry over everything from wandering to the future — all of it can be overwhelming...."

Subscribe to our ADA Expertise Listserv and get information sent directly to your inbox. To subscribe, send an email to Marc Dubin, Esq., at mdubin@pobox.com. Include your name and contact information, and write "subscribe to ADA listserv."

Blog Archive

Search This Blog

Loading...