Saturday, August 01, 2015

CDC Issues Report - One in 5 Adults Have a Disability

"One in five American adults have at least one kind of disability, according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...."

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2015/07/30/american-adults-disability/30881975/

The study, from 2013 data, says 53 million Americans have a disability.
“We know disability types and related challenges can vary,” said Elizabeth Courtney-Long, a health scientist with CDC’s National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities. “In order to understand and address their needs, we need to understand their diverse circumstances. This report provides a snapshot into that.”
The findings come days after the 25th anniversary of the implementation of the Americans with Disabilities Act, which prohibits the discrimination of someone because of his or her disability in the workplace, transportation and community.
The researchers defined a disability as a self-reported difficulty in one or more of five areas: vision, cognition, mobility, self-care or independent living. For people to have one or several of these disabilities, the study says they have to identify with the specific qualifications the researchers defined in questions.
The study defines a disability with vision as blindness or difficulty in seeing with glasses on. A disability for the cognition category means having a hard time with memory or making decisions due to a physical, mental or condition. For mobility, a disability entails having difficulty while climbing stairs. A self-care category means needing help dressing or bathing, and an independent living disability was defined as needing help to run errands.
The study is also the first state-by-state analysis of Americans with disabilities from CDC. The report found Southern states often had higher percentages of people with disabilities. For example, in Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee, 31.5%, 31.4% and 31.4%, respectively, of the state adult population has a disability.
Southern states are also more likely to have chronic diseases, including heart disease and diabetes.
The percentage of Americans in Midwestern and Northern states were nearly half those from Southern states. In Minnesota and Alaska, 16.4% and 17.7% of state residents, respectively, reported a disability.
The report also found adults who have lower education levels, lower income or are unemployed were more likely to have a disability. Broken down by race, the study revealed African American and Hispanic Americans were more likely to have a disability than white Americans.
Carol Glazer, president of the National Organization on Disability, a non-profit dedicated to the disabled community in the U.S., told USA TODAY the findings should be viewed to see how disability affects income and unemployment levels.
The non-profit's research has found that 20% of people with disabilities have a job, while 69% of people without disabilities are employed. However, younger Americans with disabilities have nearly the same access to education as children without disabilities, Glazer said. Glazer is optimistic that more educated and disabled individuals will lead to more employment among the disabled community.
"Where education goes, employment will follow," she said.
The CDC partners with several national and state disabilities programs, including the Special Olympics Healthy Athletes program and the National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability, among others.
Courtney-Long, a co-author on the CDC report, said she believes the report will allow public health officials to understand the prevalence of Americans with disabilities.
The Americans with Disabilities Act, which President George H.W. Bush signed into law on July 26, 1990, opened doors to people with disabilities to enter the workforce without discrimination and creation of more accessible locations and working conditions.
“By prohibiting discrimination and ensuring opportunity, the ADA has opened doors and brought dreams within reach,” said Attorney General Loretta Lynch at an anniversary event on July 23. “It has made our workforce stronger and our society more inclusive. And it has enhanced our nation’s understanding and recognition of all that Americans with disabilities can achieve when they are given more and nothing less than an opportunity to contribute on equal terms.”
The findings also come during the Special Olympics World Games held in Los Angeles. About 6,500 athletes from 165 countries gathered this year for the event, which has occurred since 1968. Individuals with intellectual disabilities participate in the Games each year.
“My husband and I have seen Americans unite in so many ways across the country,” said first lady Michelle Obama at the Opening Ceremony on July 25. “These Games are a perfect reflection of that unity. They show us that we’re all in this together – that we can lift up our friends and neighbors, and that we can bring out the best in each other to reach even higher heights.”

Subscribe to our ADA Expertise Listserv and get information sent directly to your inbox. To subscribe, send an email to Marc Dubin, Esq., at mdubin@pobox.com. Include your name and contact information, and write "subscribe to ADA listserv."

Advocacy Meeting Thursday Aug. 6 10 am PLEASE SHARE WIDELY

 Advocacy Meeting Thursday Aug. 6 10 am  PLEASE SHARE WIDELY


If you are unable to attend in person our toll free conference line is available. Please call 1-866-730- 7514, Conference Pin 938460# You may also participate by contacting Marc.Dubin on Skype. 

The CILSF's Disability Advocacy Council will meet on Thursday, August 6, 2015, from 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 Noon, at 6660 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, FL 33138


Please join us for an opportunity to discuss your concerns, learn about the ADA, and meet with other disability advocates. The meeting will be held at the CIL offices, located at 6660 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, FL 33138. Free parking in back. The bus stops in front of the building. 

If you are unable to attend in person our toll free conference line is available. Please call 1-866-730- 7514, Conference Pin 938460# You may also participate by contacting Marc.Dubin on Skype. 

The Disability Advocacy Council is a project of the Advocacy Program of the Center for Independent Living of South Florida. We provide free training in the ADA, to individuals with disabilities, businesses, and state and local governments. 

We address a wide range of issues, and work to create positive relationships among the disability community, businesses, and state and local governments.
Do you have questions about your rights under the ADA? Are you a business owner interested in learning how you can be disability-friendly? Do you want to know when a sign language interpreter is required, and when it is not? Are you interested in learning about service dogs? Do you want to learn about what a business is required to do under the ADA? Do you want information about shelters and services to evacuees with disabilities? Do you have questions about Medicaid Managed Care? 

Do you have problems you want to bring to our attention? Do you have questions? Join us. 

The meeting will be moderated by Marc Dubin, Esq., Director of Advocacy at the CIL. Marc is an expert in the ADA, having served as a Senior Trial Attorney at the Justice Department, in the Disability Rights Section of the Civil Rights Division. In that capacity, he provided education about the ADA nationwide, and enforced the ADA nationwide, on behalf of the United States. 

If you need an ADA accommodation to participate, please contact Mary Fountain, at 305-751-8025, or at Mary@soflacil.org, no later than July 23rd.
Subscribe to our ADA Expertise Listserv and get information sent directly to your inbox. To subscribe, send an email to Marc Dubin, Esq., at mdubin@pobox.com. Include your name and contact information, and write "subscribe to ADA listserv." 

Marc Dubin, Esq.
Director of Advocacy
Center for Independent Living of South Florida www.soflacil.org
www.ADAadvocacyBlog.org 



Subscribe to our ADA Expertise Listserv and get information sent directly to your inbox. To subscribe, send an email to Marc Dubin, Esq., at mdubin@pobox.com. Include your name and contact information, and write "subscribe to ADA listserv."

Friday, July 31, 2015

Upcoming FCCDHH Meeting - August 13

FLORIDA COORDINATING COUNCIL FOR THE DEAF AND HARD-OF-HEARING NOTICE OF QUARTERLY MEETING.
THIS IS A PUBLIC MEETING; ALL PERSONS ARE INVITED 
DATES AND TIMES: August 13, 2015, 9:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. EST August 14, 2015, 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. EST 
PUBLIC COMMENTS: The FCCDHH will take Public Comments August 13, 2015 from 4:45 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. EST PLACE: Hilton Garden Inn Orlando North/Lake Mary 705 Currency Circle Lake Mary, FL 32746 850-245-4444 Ext. 2934 
GENERAL SUBJECT MATTER TO BE CONSIDERED: The Florida Coordinating Council for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (FCCDHH) is mandated by Florida Statute 413.271 to serve as an advisory and coordinating body which recommends policies that address the needs of Florida’s community who are deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened or have combined hearing and vision loss.
PURPOSE: Discuss the development and continuation of the five-year strategic plan for the Council. A copy of the agenda may be obtained by contacting: John Escoto, Disability and Health Program Assistant; Florida Department of Health at (850) 245-4444 Ext. 3856 or at www.floridahealth.gov/fccdhh
ACCESSIBILITY: Communication Access Real-Time Translation Services: (CART) will be provided remotely via: http://www.streamtext.net/text.aspx?event=FCCDHH The meeting may be accessed via conference call: (888) 670-3525; conference code: 8338411399# Please use *6 mute your phone when calling in. 
Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring special accommodations to participate in this workshop/meeting is asked to advise the agency at least 5 days before the workshop/meeting by contacting: John Escoto, Human Services Program Specialist, Florida Department of Health at (850) 245-4444 Ext. 3856. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact the agency using the Florida Relay Service, (800) 955-8771 (TDD) or (800) 955-8770 (Voice).
Submitted by Darlene Harris Laibl-Crowe, Council Member
W.FLORIDAHEALTH.GOV




Subscribe to our ADA Expertise Listserv and get information sent directly to your inbox. To subscribe, send an email to Marc Dubin, Esq., at mdubin@pobox.com. Include your name and contact information, and write "subscribe to ADA listserv."

Tuesday, July 28, 2015

Hearing Loop Technology

What is a Hearing Loop?
A hearing loop is a wire that circles a room and is connected to a sound system. The loop transmits the sound electromagnetically. The electromagnetic signal is then picked up by the telecoil in the hearing aid or cochlear implant.
To use a hearing loop, you flip on the t-switch on the hearing aid or cochlear implant to activate the telecoil. Usually, no additional receiver or equipment is needed. Using a telecoil and hearing loop together is seamless, cost-effective, unobtrusive, and you don't have to seek additional equipment. Hearing loops are also called audio-induction loops, audio loops, or loops. If your hearing aid doesn't have a telecoil, you will need a headset plugged into a loop receiver to achieve the same effect.
Find out more by reading the Frequently Asked Questions about Hearing Loops.
What is a Telecoil?
telecoil in a hearing aid functions as a wireless antenna that links to the sound system and delivers customized sound to the listener. A telecoil is a small copper coil that is an option in most hearing aids and is built into cochlear implant processors. Telecoils also known as t-coils and were originally used to boost the magnetic signals from the telephone handset. The telecoil is activated by a t-switch. All landline and some cell phones are designed by law to be used with a telecoil.
The telecoil can make a noticeable difference in your life when combined with hearing assistive technology such as the hearing loop. This pairing of technology bridges the space between you and the sound source. The hearing loop connects the listener directly to the sound source while most of the background noise is eliminated.  (Continued at http://www.hearingloss.org/content/loop-technology)

Saturday, July 25, 2015

White House: People with Disabilities - A Resource Guide for Employers

https://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/docs/employing_people_with_disabilities_toolkit_february_3_2015_v4.pdf


This resource guide identifies relevant federal and federally funded resources for employers looking to recruit, hire, retain, and promote people with disabilities. It is designed to answer common questions raised by employers and to identify relevant resources for employers who want additional information on specific topics. The goal of this guide is to help employers implement commonsense solutions to ensure that people with disabilities, like all Americans, have the opportunity to obtain and succeed in good jobs and careers.
The guide uses a question and answer format to help employers navigate core issues related to the employment of people with disabilities. It is by no means comprehensive, but it is meant to provide answers to key questions in an easy-to-use format, with links to federal and federally funded resources that can provide further information. The guide is broken into four sections:
  1. Best Practices for Recruiting Candidates with Disabilities: Section One provides resources on how to conduct targeted outreach, ensure that the hiring process is accessible, and ask effective questions during an interview.
  2. Best Practices for Respecting, Retaining and Promoting Employees with Disabilities: Section Two provides suggestions for developing successful orientation and on-boarding, career development, and mentoring programs. It also provides information on employee resource groups, disability awareness training, and disability etiquette training.
  3. Best Practices for Providing Reasonable Accommodations: Section Three provides resources on common reasonable accommodation requests as well as suggestions for developing reasonable accommodation procedures.
  4. The Legal Framework: The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973: Section Four provides an overview of the two key civil rights laws on private sector employment of people with disabilities. 

Subscribe to our ADA Expertise Listserv and get information sent directly to your inbox. To subscribe, send an email to Marc Dubin, Esq., at mdubin@pobox.com. Include your name and contact information, and write "subscribe to ADA listserv."

Friday, July 24, 2015

Another TTY Hotline Failure - FCADV - Florida - UPDATED

UPDATE: The TTY line now works.
On a personal note, I have had the pleasure of working with various FCADV staff for several years. I want to commend them for their commitment to survivors, including survivors with disabilities. They have always been very responsive to any concerns I raise, and they always go the extra mile in helping survivors, including survivors with disabilities.

Another Hotline TTY Failure - FCADV- Florida

Saturday, July 24, 2015
Two days before the 25th Anniversary of the Passage of the ADA

I called the Florida Coalition's TTY hotline number to test it, at 10 pm Saturday, July 24th. I called 800-621-4202. Instead of ringing through to a TTY machine, it just rang and rang, without being picked up. I tested it several times, without success. See http://www.fcadv.org/florida-domestic-violence-hotline-1-800-500-1119.

I called the voice number and reported it.

UPDATE July 24:: I tested it again at midnight. Same result - just rang and rang - no answer.

UPDATE: Friday,  July 31st  720 pm:
Still broken. Just rings and rings.

Subscribe to our ADA Expertise Listserv and get information sent directly to your inbox. To subscribe, send an email to Marc Dubin, Esq., at mdubin@pobox.com. Include your name and contact information, and write "subscribe to ADA listserv."

Search This Blog

Loading...